Rhizomatic: artistic research outside the academic context

In Networks and Organizations

<p>Rhizomatic project space is a platform for young artists and curators who are interested in interdisciplinary relationships, in cross medial and cooperative projects, in artistic experimentation outside the academic context. To show and stimulate these visual experiments, rhizomatic can offer a project space in amsterdam-noord.</p>

Rhizomatic is an artistic research cluster, a visual think tank. They try to link the practice of art with the theories that inform it. In that sense the creative process can be understood as a form of research and the practice of art as a field of knowledge production. Like a cell or cluster, rhizomatic can only stay vivid due to the permanent interaction with other institutions and projects.

 

Rhizomatic is situated in noord, a formerly industrial neighborhood, now a fast developing hot spot of amsterdam’s art scene, with many studios and show rooms around. Rhizomatic is also close to the mosplein, a multicultural neighborhood with a lot of different social institutions. In that very diverse neighborhood rhizomatic plans to connect with the social context, as a mediator between the art scene and the residents.

 

This is an attempt to scetch the project rhizomatic. However, any line to be drawn, any territory to be claimed, any goal to be set and any definition to be made, might mark a boundary to the freedom of creativity. Rhizomatic is a platform. But still, I do not believe in a platform as ever being neutral: zero is never the starting point.

The Rhizomatic’s staff hope that projects will be redefined, reformed and reversed by the artists and curators working in the centre– as an international and cross-cultural spot, as a cell of innovation – to realize and present the unthinkable: the process of visual reflection.

 

Rhizomatic
papaverweg 3c
1032 kc amsterdam-noord
the netherlands

christine@rhizomatic.nl

LINK BOX
Rhizomatic: Project space for artistic research
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Originally Published 2011-12-01

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